Background

Facebook::OpenGraph – logging in to a Perl application

Getting a Perl application to talk to the Facebook API was not an enjoyable experience, mostly due to my lack of experience with Facebook’s terminology and a basic understanding of how OAuth works.

Ignorance never stops me! So when I wanted to allow visitors to log in to my Perl application via Facebook, I just started hacking away until I got everything working. I am scheduled to give a talk about this at the 2016 Dutch Perl Workshop, you can download the Presentation PDF.

My notes:

Install the Furl::HTTP and Facebook::OpenGraph modules.

Register the your application with Facebook to get your App ID and App Secret.

I broke this process up into two scripts, a ‘login’ script that acts as a landing page for incoming visitors and the application itself. The login script is going to catch the incoming request and immediately forward the visitor to the Facebook authorization page with a callback pointed at the program (index.cgi).

use Furl::HTTP;
use Facebook::OpenGraph; 
use strict;
use CGI;
my $q = new CGI;
   $q->autoEscape(0);
   $q->charset('utf8');
my $fb = Facebook::OpenGraph->new(+{
      version => 'v2.5'
    , app_id => '1234567890123456' 
    , secret => '2b6928c1283475f434a54bf45371'
    , ua => Furl::HTTP->new(capture_request => 1)
    , json => JSON->new->utf8
    , redirect_uri => 'http://applicationwebsite.com/app/index.cgi'
    });
 
my $auth_url = $fb->auth_uri(+{
       display => 'page' 
     , response_type => 'code'
     , scope => [qw/email/]
    });
print "Content-type: text/html\n\n";
print $q->redirect($auth_url);
exit;

This script takes an incoming visitor and generates an authorization URL for Facebook and then redirects the visitor directly to that Authorization URL. The ‘scope’ of my app is only asking for basic user information, no special permissions are being requested. If I wanted other, more esoteric, user information I would need to ask for specific approval to access that information.

You can see how to decode the information that gets sent to the callback URL, refer to the contents of the Presentation PDF.

 

Burnout is affecting younger people

A recent study by the Dutch organization TNO showed that 15% of workers are suffering from burnout symptoms. In the Netherlands, alone, that’s more than a million people.

I was not surprised by that finding, the vast majority of people who take the Octogram test are looking for ways to get out from under the crushing weight of their “Career”. They can see that work doesn’t *have* to suck, everyone has at least a few friends who actually like their job, so they know it’s possible to have a better career.

The surprising part of the study highlighted the age distribution of the respondents. Burnout isn’t just a risk for people in the middle of their careers, they were showing a relatively high level of problems for younger people in the 25 to 35 year old range.

Traditionally, people were to focused on spending their younger years trying to get ahead in their career without really thinking about whether or not they were in the right kind of career. That’s changing because millennials are looking for meaning and purpose in their work right out of the gate. I have been seeing some negative commentary and stereotyping about this in HR and Management discussion boards. It’s easy to minimize someone’s complaint by calling them ‘whiners’ or some such.

But the millenials are not just complaining that work is ‘too hard’, they are complaining when their work has no meaning. Everyone comes to that realization at some time during their career, they want to have work that is fulfilling and worth something. Millenials just seem to be figuring this out earlier than my own Generation X. We just rebelled without knowing what we were complaining about, Millenials just seem to be ahead of the curve.

Damn whipper-snappers!

The TNO study results are summarized here:
http://www.monitorarbeid.tno.nl/nieuws/asscher-praat-met-collegas-over-werkstress (Dutch)

You are a closed book

Experimental research (by Vazire, Newton, Yudowsky, Gilovich, Medvec and Savitsky to name just a few) has shown that you overestimate how much other people know about you, how much attention they pay to you, how much they can tell about what is going on in your head.

They don’t know what is going on in your head.

But that’s okay, because neither do you.

You overestimate your own abilities in areas were you know too little. You underestimate your expertise in areas where you are an expert (Dunning-Kruger effect). You are chock-a-block with bias and false impressions and errors in perception.

That is what the Talent Profile is good at doing. It uses a powerful psychometric instrument that slips past your own cognitive blocks to figure out what really makes you tick. It gives you a solid book of instructions on how to drive your own career. It tells you how to keep yourself interested and focused at work. It tells you where the pitfalls are and points out how to get around them.

 

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