As part of a team – [Talent Profile]

Based on the earlier sections of my Talent Profile, I was kinda scared to delve into the next section called, “Functioning as a member of a team”. I mean, when you look at the earlier sections, my scores on the Team Player and Helper roles are in the toilet. I think I get along with my co-workers okay, but what if that’s just a delusion?

So I was bracing myself to be told that I shouldn’t interact with other humans on a regular basis, but that’s not what it says at all. I prefer working alone, yes. I don’t get involved in other people’s business, in my own head I think that asking too many personal questions is just me being invasive and rude. But I’m not rude to the people I work with, if the laughter isn’t just polite, I have a good sense of humor and can tell a good story . . .  Sorry, let’s just bite the bullet here and see what the report says.

TeamplayerFunctioning as a member of a team

A well functioning organization needs to cover all the roles of the Octogram. A well functioning team needs to identify what is required and then make sure that they have the personnel in place that match up with those needs. How will Richard function when placed in a team?

  1. In the team, Richard is the man pushing everyone else to greater action. He is the one to constantly exhort his teammates to “Roll up your sleeves!” and that “Actions speak louder than words!”. He wants meetings to focus on efficiency, with concrete information on what people are actually doing.
  2. Richard encourages everyone in the team to see the big picture and look at long term goals. He is the one to usually ask questions of cause, “Why are we doing that?” or consequence, “What will be the result?”. If he thinks he has the best answer to a problem, it might take some effort to get him to see otherwise.
  3. When it comes to making decisions, Richard will make sure everyone is aware of the quantity and quality of information that is available to make that decision. If facts are in short supply, he can generate scenarios for debate and argue against positions that are not founded on solid information.

Well, it doesn’t paint me as some kind of asocial recluse. What a relief!

He is the one to usually ask questions of cause, “Why are we doing that?” or consequence, “What will be the result?

I am very much a consequentialist, when a change is suggested, I think hard about all the things that change will touch and what it means for all the other moving parts of the company/project. I also ask a lot of questions about the proposed change, will it do what you want it to do and is there another way to get that same result?

I don’t see the truth in the phrase: He is the one to constantly exhort his teammates to “Roll up your sleeves!” That sounds kind of like a cheerleader, but the rest of the sentence seems to say that this is more like an emphasis on achieving concrete results rather than an exhortation for everyone to feel good about doing it.

If facts are in short supply, he can generate scenarios for debate and argue against positions that are not founded on solid information. I can play, “What if?” with the best of them. But I have to work to balance that against the needs of the group. I want things to move forward. At some point, you have to stop thinking in scenarios and start doing something. This is a conflict within myself.

Coming to the decision, ‘pulling the trigger’ is one of my biggest challenges. Once a decision is made, I commit and start moving that decision into concrete reality, no problem. But if there is no clear logical choice, I can teeter on the brink of that forever. This is so annoying that I have, on occasion, resorted to flipping a coin and going with whatever random chance “decided”. Sometimes any decision is better than no decision at all.

The Talent Profile is available on the Octogramtest.com website.

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